TROUBLED WATER

dirtyoldbooks:

The Pantanal wetlands in Western Brazil, one of the richest areas for biodiversity in the world is under threat due to intensive farming, deforestation and water extraction imperil the rivers and springs that give it life.

The Telegraph mag sent Anatsasia Taylor-Lind to document the its beauty as it fights for survival.

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Photographs copyright: Anastasia Taylor-Lind / vii / WWF

dronestagram:

September 11 2014: Five people killed in a strike on a vehicle carrying alleged AQAP militants. #drone #drones #yemen (at Bejan, Shabwah, Yemen)

dronestagram:

September 11 2014: Five people killed in a strike on a vehicle carrying alleged AQAP militants. #drone #drones #yemen (at Bejan, Shabwah, Yemen)

simchiyin:

“I stand against the death penalty because….. life itself can be unforgiving enough.”  A photo blend made on my iPhone of my profile and an old photo found of my paternal grandfather Shen Huansheng, who was executed during the Chinese civil war by the rival Kuomintang in July 1949 in east Guangdong, China, for his role as propaganda cadre in a Chinese Communist Party guerilla army unit. He was shot in a mass execution after being imprisoned as the Kuomintang soldiers killed their prisoners while retreating towards Taiwan.  It looks like a prison photo bearing a name and date, possibly his prison photo from Malaya where he had been imprisoned by the British for leftist activities in the late 1940s, before he chose to be deported to China and then joined the Chinese Communist guerillas in the mountains near our ancestral village of Gaoshang, Taoyao, in Meixian, east Guangdong in southern China. He was killed at age 38, just a couple of years older than I am now, leaving behind his young wife and five children in Malaya. To our knowledge, he did not get to leave any final words. @chiyin_sim / Sim Chi Yin / VII #FinalWords #nodeathpenalty
Final Words has launched a #SelfieAgainstDeathPenalty campaign@marcasnin
To find out more: http://final-words.org/selfie-campaign/  #FinalWords #nodeathpenalty @viiphoto @marcasnin

simchiyin:

“I stand against the death penalty because….. life itself can be unforgiving enough.”

A photo blend made on my iPhone of my profile and an old photo found of my paternal grandfather Shen Huansheng, who was executed during the Chinese civil war by the rival Kuomintang in July 1949 in east Guangdong, China, for his role as propaganda cadre in a Chinese Communist Party guerilla army unit. He was shot in a mass execution after being imprisoned as the Kuomintang soldiers killed their prisoners while retreating towards Taiwan.
It looks like a prison photo bearing a name and date, possibly his prison photo from Malaya where he had been imprisoned by the British for leftist activities in the late 1940s, before he chose to be deported to China and then joined the Chinese Communist guerillas in the mountains near our ancestral village of Gaoshang, Taoyao, in Meixian, east Guangdong in southern China.
He was killed at age 38, just a couple of years older than I am now, leaving behind his young wife and five children in Malaya. To our knowledge, he did not get to leave any final words. @chiyin_sim / Sim Chi Yin / VII
#FinalWords #nodeathpenalty

Final Words has launched a #SelfieAgainstDeathPenalty campaign@marcasnin

To find out more: http://final-words.org/selfie-campaign/
#FinalWords #nodeathpenalty @viiphoto @marcasnin

micdotcom:

A huge portion of the population doesn’t have the right to vote

Three in 10 black men can expect to lose their right to vote at some point in their lives, according to data from 2010 compiled by the Sentencing Project, a nonprofit that works to reform the criminal justice system. In Florida, Kentucky and Virginia, which have some of the harshest felon disenfranchisement laws, 1 in 5 African-Americans is denied the right to vote.

Why this issue has gone unnoticed Follow micdotcom

Spotted in Portland.
Forwarded to me by Beth Nakamura.

Spotted in Portland.

Forwarded to me by Beth Nakamura.

Maybe, I’m a prejudice leftie here, but doesn’t it seem to you like the Berlosconians (Silvio Berlusconi supporters) are a little more plastic-fantastic and seemingly less approachable than the No Berlusconians?

First half of the preview is supporters, second half of the preview Berlusconi skeptics.

Also, the difference in the number of people wearing sunglasses between the two groups is interesting. Sunglasses are apparel of separation, intimidation and power (ask any cop or security guard). Berlusconi supporters love their sunnies. Or maybe it was just an overcast day when the photographer met the Berlusconi opponents?!

Great project by Nico Baumgarten.

http://www.nicobaumgarten.net/

(Source: vimeo.com)

the-new-frame-dot-com:

CLICK THE IMAGE ABOVE TO SEE INSIDE
Ken Grant - Flock published by Artist Photo Books (2014)
A little about Ken Grant. Grant is a documentary photographer from Liverpool and is currently a lecturer in photography at the University of Ulster. Grant is known for his long term projects and has had work published by Dewi Lewis with “The Close Season” (2002) ; and Journal with “No Pain Whatsoever” (2014) and now “Flock”.
With Flock, Grant takes us to Hereford to visit one of the last inner city Livestock & Agricultural markets in Britain. This market has been around for centuries. Aware of Hereford’s redevelopment plans, Grant took it upon himself to immortalise what’s left of the market in the last 5 years of it’s existence, until its relocation outside the city.
The images show the liveliness of the market. Where young and old, buyers and sellers fill the tight spaces of the sheds. Livestock, produce, poultry and meats, are all sold inside the sheds. But while the people in the photos are focussed on the merchandise, Grant directs our gaze towards the people. The photos are filled with interesting people and playful juxtapositions (as the title suggests). One of my favourite sequences would have to be the image with the cow alone in its pen waiting to be sold off while potential buyers surround it. Then, turn the page and there’s a “pen”of tables, over crowded with people.
It’s a great book filled with a lot of great characters and an age-old custom constantly challenged by modern changes. I hope the market manages to keep going strong in its new location. Traditions need to keep being passed on. Times are changing too quickly. Traditions are being lost and forgotten all so we can save a few bucks. People are moving away from the old ways and choosing cheaper, modern means of consumption. Online retailing has taken over. Soon markets like these will become tourist attractions rather than being the norm (it’s already the case in many places)

the-new-frame-dot-com:

CLICK THE IMAGE ABOVE TO SEE INSIDE

Ken Grant - Flock published by Artist Photo Books (2014)

A little about Ken Grant. Grant is a documentary photographer from Liverpool and is currently a lecturer in photography at the University of Ulster. Grant is known for his long term projects and has had work published by Dewi Lewis with “The Close Season” (2002) ; and Journal with “No Pain Whatsoever” (2014) and now “Flock”.

With Flock, Grant takes us to Hereford to visit one of the last inner city Livestock & Agricultural markets in Britain. This market has been around for centuries. Aware of Hereford’s redevelopment plans, Grant took it upon himself to immortalise what’s left of the market in the last 5 years of it’s existence, until its relocation outside the city.

The images show the liveliness of the market. Where young and old, buyers and sellers fill the tight spaces of the sheds. Livestock, produce, poultry and meats, are all sold inside the sheds. But while the people in the photos are focussed on the merchandise, Grant directs our gaze towards the people. The photos are filled with interesting people and playful juxtapositions (as the title suggests). One of my favourite sequences would have to be the image with the cow alone in its pen waiting to be sold off while potential buyers surround it. Then, turn the page and there’s a “pen”of tables, over crowded with people.

It’s a great book filled with a lot of great characters and an age-old custom constantly challenged by modern changes. I hope the market manages to keep going strong in its new location. Traditions need to keep being passed on. Times are changing too quickly. Traditions are being lost and forgotten all so we can save a few bucks. People are moving away from the old ways and choosing cheaper, modern means of consumption. Online retailing has taken over. Soon markets like these will become tourist attractions rather than being the norm (it’s already the case in many places)

hldky:

Petter Berg

hldky:

Petter Berg

(Source: nyctaeus)

ericgphoto:

Industrial Zones take 2 

Graham MacIndoe:
“Addicts are just as much part of the consumer culture swayed by branding and product placement as those who buy iPhones, gym membership or the latest Lycra whatever. But heroin is the ultimate product because you really have to come back again and again.”
More: The Dark, Ironic Branding Drug Dealers Use to Sell Heroin

Graham MacIndoe:

“Addicts are just as much part of the consumer culture swayed by branding and product placement as those who buy iPhones, gym membership or the latest Lycra whatever. But heroin is the ultimate product because you really have to come back again and again.”

More: The Dark, Ironic Branding Drug Dealers Use to Sell Heroin

"I ONLY STALK YOU BECAUSE I CARE"  
Installation view of ‘M for Stalking’ by Rasha Kahilat the Affluenza Exhibition, Clerkenwell, London, March 2009.
Kahil: 
The advent of social networking sites in recent years has created a virtual sphere in  which society immerses itself in observing and being observed by its own constituents. We spy on each other’s activities, friend lists, and surf through snapshot photo galleries, measuring ourselves against others to construct our own self-worth. Privacy is slowly relinquished. Our life, as we decide to share it online, becomes public property. And, as a consequence, by scouring the net and collecting every single image of M (an ex-boyfriend) that I could find by infiltrating his network, M for Stalking denounces this collective conscious awareness of a ‘legalized’, openly acknowledged form of Web-Stalking.

"I ONLY STALK YOU BECAUSE I CARE"  

Installation view of ‘M for Stalking’ by Rasha Kahilat the Affluenza Exhibition, Clerkenwell, London, March 2009.

Kahil: 

The advent of social networking sites in recent years has created a virtual sphere in  which society immerses itself in observing and being observed by its own constituents. We spy on each other’s activities, friend lists, and surf through snapshot photo galleries, measuring ourselves against others to construct our own self-worth. Privacy is slowly relinquished. Our life, as we decide to share it online, becomes public property. And, as a consequence, by scouring the net and collecting every single image of M (an ex-boyfriend) that I could find by infiltrating his network, M for Stalking denounces this collective conscious awareness of a ‘legalized’, openly acknowledged form of Web-Stalking.

Get yourself down to Haines Gallery at 49 Geary, SF! My bud Nigel Poor has an exhibition for which she collaborated with her prisoner-students at San Quentin Prison.

She found a box of 4x5 negs from the 70s and 80s made by the prison administration, developed them and is now showing them. She also printed selects and asked current prisoners to interpret them by scrawling on cheap prints. It’s a beautifully engaged social project. And it’s just the beginning. There’s another 12 boxes and thousands of negs to be explored! #prisonphotography. Good stuff.

Get yourself down to Haines Gallery at 49 Geary, SF! My bud Nigel Poor has an exhibition for which she collaborated with her prisoner-students at San Quentin Prison.

She found a box of 4x5 negs from the 70s and 80s made by the prison administration, developed them and is now showing them. She also printed selects and asked current prisoners to interpret them by scrawling on cheap prints. It’s a beautifully engaged social project. And it’s just the beginning. There’s another 12 boxes and thousands of negs to be explored! #prisonphotography. Good stuff.

Selfie experiments.

Hey! @finalwordsbook wants to do away with the death penalty in America. Photographer Marc Asnin is building curricula for high school kids and a national campaign using the last statements of 515 people executed in Texas as the points of departure for discussion. To get everyone talking about it, Final Words has launched ‘The Selfies Against Death Penalty’ initiative.

Heck we’re making selfies anyway — we might as well throw them in with a campaign to do away with a medieval form of vengeance.

Visit www.final-words.org to submit your own selfie.

Selfie experiments.

Hey! @finalwordsbook wants to do away with the death penalty in America. Photographer Marc Asnin is building curricula for high school kids and a national campaign using the last statements of 515 people executed in Texas as the points of departure for discussion. To get everyone talking about it, Final Words has launched ‘The Selfies Against Death Penalty’ initiative.

Heck we’re making selfies anyway — we might as well throw them in with a campaign to do away with a medieval form of vengeance.

Visit www.final-words.org to submit your own selfie.

'Guantanamo Operational Security Review' by @louiepalu. This newsprint experiment can be pulled apart, reordered and even stuck on a wall if you fancy. 12 double spreads.

"Who Controls What You See?" is the main inquiry of this little publication, I am told. Palu’s image that I’ve rephotographed here shows an arrow on the concrete floor of Camp 6, Guantanamo. The arrow points to Mecca.

#photobookjousting. Good stuff.

'Guantanamo Operational Security Review' by @louiepalu. This newsprint experiment can be pulled apart, reordered and even stuck on a wall if you fancy. 12 double spreads.

"Who Controls What You See?" is the main inquiry of this little publication, I am told. Palu’s image that I’ve rephotographed here shows an arrow on the concrete floor of Camp 6, Guantanamo. The arrow points to Mecca.

#photobookjousting. Good stuff.